Wood Burning Stoves

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Leicaman
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Re: Wood Burning Stoves

Postby Leicaman » Mon Feb 12, 2018 9:10 pm

Damn, that looks like good stuff to be dropped off on your doorstep. I cycled over to my usual maki pickup yesterday. They had loads of wood there but it wasn’t in the best condition. I might wait for something better. Also, squeezing it in the back of my car is a hassle. I need to find somewhere nearer that wants to get rid of their scraps. You are lucky ;)

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Zasso Nouka
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Re: Wood Burning Stoves

Postby Zasso Nouka » Tue Feb 13, 2018 6:08 am

We are lucky to have a few lumber yards within a few minutes drive and for them we are handy to get rid of all the wood they can't use. This year I want to try using the off cuts from where they 'square' round tree trunks into squarish lengths for further processing. It's not the thickest wood (around 5 - 8cm) but if you stack it or layer it up inside your wood stove it burns for quite a while and it's really easy to process, all you need is a circular saw to cut it to length.

If you have any lumber yards with houses nearby they aren't allowed to burn off the waste wood so would probably jump at the chance to have someone that would take it off their hands.
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korekaranoka
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Re: Wood Burning Stoves

Postby korekaranoka » Sat Feb 17, 2018 10:25 am

Hi guys (and girls?)!

Just wondering, as I’ve seen no mention of them in your posts, has anyone come across a karamatsu stove? They’re quite popular here in Nagano and made not far from where I live (Komoro or Tōmi, I think). Still renting a flat at the moment while I get the farm up and running so I won’t be buying quite yet, but I’ve been doing some research for when we finally make the move further up into the hills.

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Re: Wood Burning Stoves

Postby Zasso Nouka » Sat Feb 17, 2018 1:10 pm

I haven't seen one burning so this is more speculation than anything else but after browsing through their website (カラマツストーブ) here is what I would want to know before buying one.

Is it single wall iron/steel, double or triple wall ? Does it perform primary, secondary, tertiary or even quaternary (is that even a word ?) combustion ? Primary combustion is all good and well but for maximum efficiency and to burn off as much tar/creosote as possible you'd want a stove to at least perform secondary combustion and tertiary or quaternary combustion would be a nice bonus. Primary combustion on it's down doesn't wring every last BTU out of the wood you are burning, part of the reason for having a double or triple walled design is preheated air can be delivered to the inside of the stove and burn off much of the volatile gasses that don't get burned in primary combustion. That gets extra heat and keeps your chimney cleaner. Have a read of this Nestor Martin Woodbox Technology to get some idea of how that works. Other stove manufacturers obviously have a slightly different take on it but it's basically the same idea.

Is the glass single or double glazed ? Double glazed doors are much easier to keep clean as the higher temperature of the internal surface means soot & creosote is mostly burned off. Single glazed doors are a bit harder to keep clean, not impossible but they do require somewhat more regular cleaning. If you aren't bothered about watching the flames then a small glass panel would be fine but if you want to spend time staring at the flames then a large glass door is ideal.

Ideally you want the ash pan to be under the stove so that you can empty it while the stove is still burning and not have to wait for the fire to go out to clean it. That way it can be kept continuously burning for several days if the weather requires it, my shed stove has to completely cool down before you can clean out the ash but both our house and cafe stoves can be emptied whilst in operation.

We burn mostly sugi and hinoki in our stove because that's what we have around and we save hardwood for the overnight part of the burn so it's still going in the morning. Because of the stove's secondary combustion facility it's not a major problem keeping the chimney clean and most modern stoves will act in a similar way when burning softwood.

Can the stove do an overnight burn ? Having that facility where you can tamp the burn down low enough so that it is still going in the morning is a major bonus and this can also be useful if you are out working all day and want to come home to a warm house. Load it up just before you go out and it should still be burning when you get home.

I always recommend that folk buy the largest stove they can, you don't need to pack it full and have it blazing away all the time but it does come in handy when leaving it burning for a long time or when you come home to a cold house and want to heat it up quickly.

I'd also want to know how many BTU's or Kw's a stove can output before making a purchase so that it could be compared to other stoves.

Is a lack of any of those features a total deal breaker ? No probably not but they do all enhance the user experience and contribute to an easy to use and maintain stove.
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